Smoking | Categories Utah Women and Health Risk Factors | DOI: 10.26054/0K3J3EKDBS

Background

Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death and disease in the United States. Smoking claims more than 440,000 lives each year. It has been shown that smoking increases the risk for chronic lung disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke, as well as cancer of the lungs, larynx, esophagus, mouth, and bladder. In addition, smoking contributes to cancer of the cervix, pancreas, and kidneys. Exposure to secondhand smoke increases the risk for heart disease and lung cancer among nonsmokers. The Healthy People 2010 goal is to reduce the proportion of females who smoke cigarettes from the baseline of 22% in 1997 to the 2010 target of 12%.

Risk Factors

Cigarette smoking is more common among persons with lower levels of formal education, and among those in lower income groups. Smoking increases the risk for chronic lung disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke, as well as cancer of the lungs, larynx, esophagus, mouth, and bladder.

Percentage of Adult Females that Currently Smoke by Education Level, Utah 2005. Source: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Center for Health Data, IBIS, Utah Department of Health

Utah Data vs. U.S. – How are we doing?

Utah’s adult smoking rate has been the lowest in the nation for many years. In 2005, Utah’s adult smoking was 11.2% compared to the national rate of 20.6%. For adult females Utah’s rate is 9.3% compared to 19.2% nationally.

Percentage of Adult Females that Currently Smoke, Utah and U.S. 2005. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data

Services/Hotlines

The TRUTH campaign uses television, radio, billboard, and print media to target mainstream and high risk youth, adults, pregnant women, Native Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and rural populations. The campaign’s goals are to counter tobacco industry messages, inform Utahns about quitting services, and reinforce and support local tobacco control efforts. Quitting services available to Utahns include a toll-free Tobacco Quit Line (1-888-567-TRUTH), a web-based quitting service (utah.quitnet.com), free quitting medications and counseling services for uninsured tobacco users and tobacco users on Medicaid, and group-based quitting classes for adults and youth in local communities. Efforts to protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke focus on strengthening tobacco-free policies in apartment complexes, workplaces, schools, and outdoor venues frequented by children.

The Utah Tobacco Quit Line and Utah’s online quitting program offer assistance in quitting tobacco use to Utah adults and teens. For services and information call the Utah Tobacco Quit Line at 1-888-567-TRUTH or visit Utah’s online tobacco cessation support program at utahquitnet.com.

References

  • HP2010 Objective 27.1a
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, custom query accessed 1/4/07
  • Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, Office of Public Health Assessment, Utah Department of Health, custom query accessed 1/4/07